Headache Clinic | University of British Columbia | Headache Clinic University of British Columbia Headache Page
Although most moderate to severe headaches are migraines, not all headaches are migraines. In fact there are 22 different primary headache disorders and hundreds of secondary headache disorders defined by the International Headache Society.
Headache, Migraine, UBC, Clinic, headache treatment, migraine treatment, headache education, migraine education, headache adults, headache support, migraine adults, migraine support, head health, head pain, face pain, neck pain, cluster headache, tension, tension headache, chronic migraine
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Headache

Headache

 

Although most moderate to severe headaches are migraines, not all headaches are migraines. In fact there are 22 different primary headache disorders and hundreds of secondary headache disorders defined by the International Headache Society.

 

A secondary headache is one that is due to a lesion, damage or metabolic derangement, which affects the brain or its surrounding structures, for example tumor, meningitis, or thyroid dysfunction.  Whereas a primary headache is one that occurs in the absence of a secondary cause for example Migraine, Tension Type Headache, Cluster Headache, Trigeminal Neuralgia, Atypical Face Pain, and Episodic Hemicrania.

 

Both primary and secondary headaches are diagnosed and treated through the headache clinic. Conditions commonly managed through the clinic include: Migraine, Migraine with aura, Chronic Migraine, Migraine Aura without Headache, Rebound Headache, Tension Headache, Cluster Headache, Trigeminal Neuralgia, Atypical Face Pain, Hemicrania Continua, Low CSF Pressure Headache, Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension, Coital headache, Exercise induced Headache, Post-Traumatic Headaches, New Daily Persistent Headache, SUNCT, and Occipital Neuralgia.